Paper by Martin L. Demaine

Reference:
Erik D. Demaine and Martin L. Demaine, “Recent Results in Computational Origami”, in Origami3: Proceedings of the 3rd International Meeting of Origami Science, Math, and Education (OSME 2001), Monterey, California, March 9–11, 2001, pages 3–16, A K Peters.

Abstract:
Computational origami is a recent branch of computer science studying efficient algorithms for solving paper-folding problems. This field essentially began with Robert Lang's work on algorithmic origami design [25], starting around 1993. Since then, the field of computational origami has grown significantly. The purpose of this paper is to survey the work in the field, with a focus on recent results, and to present several open problems that remain. The survey cannot hope to be complete, but we attempt to cover most areas of interest.

Updates:
Barry A. Cipra wrote an article describing some of these results, “In the Fold: Origami Meets Mathematics”, SIAM News 34(8):200-201, October 2001.

Length:
The submitted version is 10 pages.

Availability:
The submitted version is available in PostScript (490k), gzipped PostScript (120k), and PDF (178k).
See information on file formats.
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Related webpages:
Folding and Unfolding (Erik Demaine)


See also other papers by Martin Demaine.
These pages are generated automagically from a BibTeX file.
Last updated December 13, 2016 by Martin Demaine.